Clinical outcomes of double pelvic osteotomies in eight dogs with hip dysplasia aged 10-28 months

Authors: 
Massimo Petazzoni, Roberto Tamburro
Vet Surg. 2021 Oct 13. doi: 10.1111/vsu.13737.

Objective: To report the short-term outcome of double pelvic osteotomy (DPO) in dogs with canine hip dysplasia ≥10 months of age.

Study design: Case series.

Animals or sample population: Eleven hips in eight dogs aged between 10 to 28 months.

Methods: Dogs clinically affected by hip dysplasia with a hip reduction angle <40°, subluxation angle <25°, dorsal acetabular rim angle between 7.5-25°, and minimal osteoarthritic changes were considered as candidates for DPO. The clinical outcome was subjectively assessed using a lameness score and pain scale upon hip extension. Norberg angle, percentage of the area of the femoral head coverage, percentage of linear femoral head coverage, pelvic width dimensions were measured on pre and postoperative radiographs.

Results: At the 8-week follow-up examination, all the dogs had no lameness with no pain upon hip extension. Median Norberg angle increased by 21.8% (p < .01), median percentage of the area of the femoral head coverage increased by 66.7% (p < .01) and percentage of linear femoral head coverage increased by 162.5% (p < .01) 1 year after DPO. No changes to pelvic canal width after DPO were detected.

Conclusion: Double pelvic osteotomy improved joint congruity and clinical signs in dogs affected by hip dysplasia without osteoarthritis that were ≥10 months of age.

Clinical significance (or impact): Double pelvic osteotomy may be a treatment option for dogs with hip dysplasia ≥10 months of age. A large study assessing long-term outcomes is indicated.

Small animal: