Knee

BACKGROUND: Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is the most frequent orthopedic disorder in human and animals. An array of surgical techniques have been described to stabilize the stifle joint in dogs, including intraarticular stabilization, extraarticular stabilization, and tibial osteotomy techniques. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy and tibial tuberosity advancement with a lot of modifications are the most common.

OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on markers of synovial inflammation and signs of pain, function, bone healing, and osteoarthritis following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs with spontaneous cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). ANIMALS 12 client-owned dogs with unilateral CCLR.

Category: Knee

OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors associated with surgical site infection (SSI) in dogs following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

Category: Knee

OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on radiographic healing and limb function after uncomplicated, stable osteotomies in dogs.

STUDY DESIGN: In vivo, prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-control study.

SAMPLE POPULATION: Fifty client-owned dogs.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on clinical outcomes in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease treated with tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

STUDY DESIGN: Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Owners and surgeons (care providers and assessors) were masked.

BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament rupture (ACLR) is a debilitating and potentially life-changing condition in humans, as there is a high prevalence of early-onset osteoarthritis after injury. Identification of high-risk individuals before they become patients is important, as post-treatment lifetime burden of ACLR in the USA ranges from $7.6 to $17.7 billion annually. ACLR is a complex disease with multiple risk factors including genetic predisposition.

Dogs are commonly affected with cruciate ligament rupture (CR) and associated osteoarthritis (OA), and frequently develop a second contralateral CR. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a component of whole blood that contains numerous growth factors, which in combination with a collagen scaffold may act to promote bioenhanced primary repair of ligament.

BACKGROUND: The cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is the most commonly encountered orthopedic condition in dogs. Among the various techniques to treat this condition, tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) has been used to obtain rapid recovery of the affected knee. The objective of this study was to evaluate the viability of the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) implanted in the osteotomy site obtained by TTA in nine dogs diagnosed with CCLR.

The purpose of this study was to assess intra-articular use of a nonabsorbable braided suture tape for its biocompatibility when implanted adjacent to the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in a canine model. Establishing biocompatibility of suture tape in the knee is an important foundational step for clinicians considering use of suture tape augmentation for ACL reconstruction or repair.