Tendon and Ligament Injuries

The purpose of this study was to assess intra-articular use of a nonabsorbable braided suture tape for its biocompatibility when implanted adjacent to the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in a canine model. Establishing biocompatibility of suture tape in the knee is an important foundational step for clinicians considering use of suture tape augmentation for ACL reconstruction or repair.

Objective: To report sonographic findings for dogs with a supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) treated with an ultrasound-guided intratendinous injection of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

Methods: Medical records for dogs diagnosed with an ST and treated with a BMAC-PRP injection were reviewed. Data collected included patient signalment, radiographic findings at the time of initial evaluation, and sonographic findings, including cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber pattern, and echogenicity.

CASE HISTORY: Five juvenile Labrador Retrievers between the ages of 6 and 8 months were presented to our referral centres with a history of intermittent forelimb lameness.

CLINICAL EXAMINATION: The clinical examination revealed the presence of bilateral orthopaedic problems in four out of five cases.

BACKGROUND: Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is a prevalent injury in dogs, and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) is one of the preferred surgical techniques. Surgical site infection is a possible complication following TPLO and measurement of serum acute phase proteins is suggested to be a way to early recognize and distinguish postoperative infectious complications from normal postoperative inflammatory conditions.

BACKGROUND: Bone healing and assessment of the state of bone bridging is an important part of clinical orthopedics, whether for fracture healing or for follow up of osteotomy procedures. Tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) is designed to restore stability in cruciate deficient stifle joints by advancing the tuberosity while creating an osteotomy gap.

Radiographic flexor cortical lysis indicates advanced degenerative change and its earlier recognition may improve case outcome. Aims of this prospective, diagnostic accuracy study were to determine effects of radiographic beam angle and observer on accuracy of lesion detection.

OBJECTIVE: Large muscular or musculotendinous defects present a dilemma because of the inadequacies of current treatment strategies. Extracellular matrices (ECM) are potential clinically applicable regenerative biomaterials. This review summarizes information from the preclinical literature evaluating the use of ECM for muscle regeneration in animal models of volumetric muscle loss (VML).

STUDY DESIGN: Literature review.

SAMPLE POPULATION: Animal models of VML in which surgical repair was performed with an ECM product, with or without added cell populations.

BACKGROUND: Flexor tendon injury is common, and tendon reconstruction is indicated clinically if the primary repair fails or cannot be performed immediately after tendon injury. The purpose of the current study was to compare clinically standard extrasynovial autologous graft (EAG) tendon and intrasynovial allogeneic graft (IAG) that had both undergone biolubricant surface modification in a canine in vivo model.

This study reports data from a larger number of cases of triceps tendon disruption.

This study was to test our hypothesis that flexor tendon reconstruction with an allograft revitalized with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and synovialized with carbodiimide derivatized autologous synovial fluid (cd-SYN) would result in better digit functional restoration than the conventional allograft tendon.