Laminitis

Authors: Susan Eastman, Ric F. Redden, Carey A. Williams
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Venography is a very valuable tool that can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of laminitis. It can be used to assess vascular damage in the hoof before changes in radiographic detail occur. When used at onset, the venogram proves to be most valuable. They can not only give baseline measurements but can also show the level of damage that has already occurred. Initial venograms allow farriers and veterinarians to evaluate what degree of corrective treatment is necessary for the best outcome. In addition, a series of venograms can show the process of pathology as well as recovery.

Authors: Bianca Patan-Zugaj, Dr med vet; Felicia C. Gauff, DVM; Theresia F. Licka, Prof Dr med vet
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To examine the effect of endotoxins on metabolism and histopathologic changes of isolated perfused equine forelimbs. Sample—Forelimbs (comprising the metacarpus and digit) were collected from cadavers of 12 healthy adult horses after slaughter at an abattoir (14 limbs; 1 forelimb of 10 horses and both forelimbs of 2 horses). Procedures—Forelimbs were perfused for 10 hours with autologous blood, with and without the addition of endotoxin (80 ng of lipopolysaccharide [LPS]/L).

Category: Equine - Laminitis
Authors: Simon N. Collins, PhD; Sue J. Dyson, PhD; Rachel C. Murray, PhD; J. Richard Newton, PhD; Faith Burden, PhD; Andrew F. Trawford​‌
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To establish and validate an objective method of radiographic diagnosis of anatomic changes in laminitic forefeet of donkeys on the basis of data from a comprehensive series of radiographic measurements.

Animals—85 donkeys with and 85 without forelimb laminitis for baseline data determination; a cohort of 44 donkeys with and 18 without forelimb laminitis was used for validation analyses.

Authors: Claire E. Wylie, Simon N. Collins, Kristien L.P. Verheyen, J. Richard Newton
Journal: Veterinary Journal

Epidemiological studies into the risk factors for naturally-occurring equine laminitis are limited. There are a small number of such studies, although the results are inconsistent and remain disputed. The reasons for the conflicting results remain unclear. The aim of this review was to critically evaluate previous research in order to identify publications which provide the best evidence of risk factors for naturally-occurring equine laminitis. A systematic review of English language publications was conducted using MEDLINE (1950–2010), CAB Direct (1910–2010) and IVIS (1997–2010).

Authors: G. Schvartz, G. Kelmer, D. Berlin
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

The case report presented here describes in detail the treatment and clinical progression of a case of severe chronic laminitis in a 10-month-old Arabian filly. Starting from the acute onset of clinical signs through the severe, debilitating progression of the disease, the report describes the medical, surgical and farriery treatment over a period of 8 months. The combination of deep digital flexor tendon tenotomy, hoof wall resection, corrective trimming and shoeing was successful in halting progression of the disease.

Category: Case study - Equine - Laminitis
Authors: Heidi L. Reesink, VMD; Thomas J. Divers, DVM; Lauren C. Bookbinder; Andrew W. van Eps, BVSc, PhD; Leo V. Soderholm, BS; Hussni O. Mohammed, BVSc, PhD; Jonathan Cheetham, VetMB, PhD
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To compare effects of 3 methods of topically applied cold treatment (cryotherapy) on digital laminar and venous temperatures in horses.

Animals—9 healthy adult Thoroughbreds.

Category: Equine - Laminitis
Authors: Richard L. Griffin, Alexia L. McKnight, Amy Rucker, Scott D. Bennett, Deana M. Fiser
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Plain radiographic imaging inadequately identifies soft-tissue pathology and only distinguishes chronic laminitis after the development of notable displacement of the distal phalanx. The window of opportunity for maximum response to treatment occurs before biomechanical failure of the lamellar attachment. Radiographic and magnetic resonance venograms allow vascular assessment of patients affected with acute laminitis.

Category: Equine - Laminitis - MRI
Authors: J. E. VIRGIN, L. R. GOODRICH, G. M. BAXTER, S. RAO
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: To determine the incidence of support limb laminitis among horses treated with half limb, full limb or transfixation pin casts and determine potential risk factors.

Methods: Medical records of 113 horses treated with half limb, full limb or transfixation pin casts at an equine referral hospital from 2000 to 2009 were reviewed. Associations between potential risk factors and development of support limb laminitis were evaluated by bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses.

Authors: Claire E. Wylie, Simon N. Collins, Kristien L.P. Verheyen, J. Richard Newton
Journal: The Veterinary Journal

Equine laminitis is a highly debilitating disease of the foot. Despite its perceived importance, epidemiological characteristics are poorly understood and the true frequency of the disease remains unclear. The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess previous research to identify publications which provide the best evidence of the frequency of naturally-occurring equine laminitis. A systematic review of English language publications was conducted using MEDLINE (1950–2010), CAB Direct (1910–2010) and IVIS (1997–2010).

Category: Equine - Laminitis
Authors: R. A. CARTER, J. B. ENGILES, S. O. MEGEE, M. SENOO, H. L. GALANTINO-HOMER
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: Abnormal epidermal stem cell regulation may contribute to the pathogenesis of equine chronic laminitis.

Objective: To analyse the involvement of p63, a regulator of epidermal stem cell proliferative potential, in chronic laminitis.

Methods: Epidermal tissues from skin, coronet and lamellae of the dorsal foot were harvested from 5 horses with chronic laminitis and 5 control horses. Tissues were analysed using histopathology, immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative immunoblotting

Category: Equine - Laminitis - Podiatry